Beth pear trees

  • Best seller
  • Pick: Early-season (late August)
  • Flowering group: 3
  • Uses: Eat fresh 
  • Pollination partners
RHS AGM for Beth

Beth is an excellent early-season pear, very well suited to the UK climate. It grows in a neat and compact fashion (although quite upright like most pears), and cropping is very good in most situations.

It has a particularly good flavour, with the characteristic melting texture usually associated with the French pear varieties.

In short Beth is the ideal pear for the allotment or back garden.

Beth pear trees for sale

Deliveries start December 2018.

Mature size* Supplied as Price Quantity
Medium  (2.5m - 3m after 5-10 years) 1-year - bare-root - Quince Eline rootstock 26.90 Sold outalert me
Large  (3m - 4m after 5-10 years) 1-year - bare-root - Quince A rootstock 23.90 Sold outalert me
Large  (3m - 4m after 5-10 years) 2-year bush-trained - bare-root - Quince A rootstock 24.90

Delivery period: Trees are delivered between November and March. However it is best to order as soon as you can to ensure items are reserved for you. If you live in an area with very cold winters please let us know so that we can scheduled delivery for early spring.

*Mature size: Height shown is the approximate height of the tree when mature (after 5-10 years), not the height when supplied. Actual mature heights may vary considerably dependent on your local conditions and training and pruning regime.

Stock availability: Items showing as 'sold out' will probably be available again next season. Click here to be notified when we get more trees of this variety.

Summary features of Beth

Growing

  • Gardening skill: Suitable for beginners?
  • Cropping: Heavy
  • Fertility: Not self-fertile?
  • Flowering group: 3?
  • Pollinating others: Average?
  • Ploidy: Diploid?
  • Vigour: Weak growing?
  • Bearing regularity: Regular?
  • Fruit bearing: Spur-bearer?
  • Fruit persistence: Normal ripening?
  • Scab: Some resistance?

Uses

  • Picking season: Early
    late August / early September?
  • Use / keeping: 1 week?
  • Flavour quality: Very good?
  • Flavour style: Sweeter
  • Good for eating fresh
  • Drying / Discoloring: Slightly oxidising?

Identification

  • Country of origin: United Kingdom
  • Period of origin: 1900 - 1949
  • Fruit colour: Green - light
  • Leaf colour: Green
  • RHS AGM: RHS AGM
  • Popularity: Best sellers?

Climate

  • Temperate climates
  • Planting position: Full sun preferred

Pollination guide for Beth

Beth is in flowering group 3. Beth is self-sterile and needs to be pollinated by another tree of a different variety nearby. Since it flowers in the middle of the blossom season it can be pollinated by most other pear trees.

How to grow Beth pear trees

Beth is one of the easiest pears to grow, and along with Invincible and Conference is a good choice if you have less than perfect conditions.

Beth is a low-vigour variety, yet with a heavy cropping potential. This combination can lead to small fruit size, but this is readily addressed by thinning the fruitlets in late May - thinning is a particularly effective technique with Beth.

Beth comes into bearing quite young by the standards of most pears, you are likely to get some fruit within 2-3 years. However, be wary of letting it fruit too heavily too early, as this can slow further growth of the tree.

The picking season is starts at the end of August in the southern UK, a bit later further north. Keep a close eye on the crop at this stage, and pick the pears whilst they are still hard and ripen in a fruit bowl - they should not be ripened on the tree.

Beth is self-sterile so needs a pollination partner, but will be pollinated by a large number of other pear varieties.

Pears are generally more tolerant than apples to wet soils, but much less tolerant of drought conditions. Like all pears, Beth benefits from watering during the spring, as soon as the blossom starts to appear - if there is insufficient rain then apply 4-5 litres of water per day.

Historical details

Beth was developed at the East Malling Research Station in the UK in the 1930s by Henry Tydeman (who also developed many apple varieties including Tydeman's Late Orange). Beth is a cross between Beurre Superfin and Williams' Bon Chretien.

Botanical name

Pyrus communis 'Beth'